Outdoor Education Program Reaches 100,000 K-12 Grade Students Over 30 Years

Web of Life Field (WOLF) School provides programs for children to explore and discover nature at camps in Livermore, Aptos, Yosemite and Cazadero.

APTOS, CALIF. (PRWEB) JUNE 28, 2019

For 30 straight years, the Web of Life Field (WOLF) School has been teaching youth about science and nature through outdoor education programs that empower kids to return home with tools to strengthen their communities. Serving 4,000 school aged children per year, for 30 years, means WOLF outdoor education programs have reached 100,000 children.

Outdoor education and team building programs provide vital experiences for California’s students. These programs are led by professionally-trained naturalists at stunning camps throughout California where students explore, discover, and learn through activities designed to encourage kids to develop leadership, communication skills, and cooperation. At camp, away from technological distractions, students have fun, explore the outdoors, sing songs, play active games and learn to live together in a community. This gives students the opportunity to make hands-on connections between classroom learning and the world around them in a safe and positive outdoor environment.

All WOLF School programs are in line with the California State Standards and support Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Partnering with school teachers and other organizations, WOLF School is passionate about building respect, appreciation and stewardship.

Currently WOLF School brings its outdoor education programs to Monte Toyon Camp in Aptos, Camp Cazadero in Cazadero, Camp Tuolumne Trails by Yosemite, and Camp Arroyo in Livermore. “We want to provide outdoor experiences for as many people as possible in as many locations as possible.” says Heather Butler, Director of WOLF School

WOLF School specializes in three different programs: First, the Outdoor Science School is a hands-on science education program set in the beautiful redwoods, beach, or in the Sierra pine forest. The students explore the concepts of Energy, Cycles, Change, Adaptations, Communities, Interdependence, and Diversity as they engage directly with the redwoods, tidepools, and other outdoor areas. Secondly, Personal Awareness Community Commitment (WOLF P.A.C.C.) Team Building program focuses on the students discovering the key to successful communication, responsibility, and personal growth. Students achieve this success through unique series of team building activities that summon positive choices, cooperation, and respect. Lastly, the California Living History program takes the students on a journey through California’s history. Students learn about native peoples, our environment, the Gold Rush, and our natural resources through the eyes of immigrants, pioneers, Native Americans, and prospectors.

WOLF School also offers different seasonal camps which are available for children and families to attend and register for independently: Summer Nature Day CampBeginner and Advanced Level Backpacking Camp and Family Camp. Each camp is geared to provide a dynamic opportunity for WOLF’s School’s community to engage in the local ecology of Santa Cruz through a relaxed setting of fun and nature.

Teachers and parents can sign up to receive our WOLF School Newsletters to stay informed of upcoming programming or visit us at wolfschool.org or call (831) 684-0148. WOLF School is program provided by United Camps, Conferences & Retreats.

Coastal Redwood Camp & Retreat Center Offers Self-Guided "Nature in a Knapsack" for Guests Looking for Nature Experience

Camp Cazadero, a camp and retreat center nestled in the coastal redwoods and located in Cazadero, California, has announced a new “Nature Knapsack” program for groups of all ages to be released Spring 2019.

With help from the Web of Life Field School (WOLF School) naturalists, nature exploration activities specific to Camp Cazadero are put into a small knapsack for groups to use while exploring trails, forest, and fauna. Nature Knapsack has activities for exploring the 1,000 acre site which groups who come to the site can utilize to enhance their programs. The activities and nature trails are self-guided.

Our Nature Knapsack is designed to get children, youth, and adults outside and bring them closer to nature, while developing their observational skills. This discovery pack includes a guide for tree and animal identification and other aspects unique to the redwood forest.

The Child Mind Institute cites Richard Louv, author of the book Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder identifies 7 positive growth factors when kids get outside:

1) It builds confidence. The way that kids play in nature has a lot less structure than most types of indoor play. There are infinite ways to interact with outdoor environments, from the backyard to the park to the local hiking trail or lake, and letting your child choose how he treats nature means he has the power to control his own actions.

2) It promotes creativity and imagination. This unstructured style of play also allows kids to interact meaningfully with their surroundings. They can think more freely, design their own activities, and approach the world in inventive ways.

3) It teaches responsibility. Living things die if mistreated or not taken care of properly, and entrusting a child to take care of the living parts of their environment means they’ll learn what happens when they forget to water a plant, or pull a flower out by its roots.

4) It provides different stimulation. Nature may seem less stimulating than your son’s violent video game, but in reality, it activates more senses—you can see, hear, smell, and touch outdoor environments. 

5) It gets kids moving. Most ways of interacting with nature involve more exercise than sitting on the couch. Not only is exercise good for kids’ bodies, but it seems to make them more focused and calm.

6) It makes them think. Louv says that nature creates a unique sense of wonder for kids that no other environment can provide. The phenomena that occur naturally in backyards and parks everyday make kids ask questions about the earth and the life that it supports.

7) Finally, It reduces stress and fatigue. In natural environments, we practice an effortless type of attention known as soft fascination that creates feelings of pleasure, not fatigue.

While this Nature Knapsack program is geared toward children youth, adult groups will enjoy the experience of nature-based activities as well. For child and youth groups, Camp Cazadero is offering a discounted outdoor-education lodging and meal rate for Knapsack program participants.

Camp Cazadero is managed and operated by United Camps, Conferences & Retreats (UCCR), a non-profit camp and retreat management cooperative. The Web of Life Field School (WOLF School) is an outdoor education school of UCCR.

Visit Camp Cazadero on the web at http://www.uccr.org/cazadero/ or call UCCR at 800-678.5102 to reserve a stay.